While These Farmers are Working on Irrigation They Hit a Big Object They Thought It Was a Stone But When They Lift the Object, They Were Surprised on What They Found

Remember “Manny”? Not the famous boxer, but Manny from the movie, ‘Ice Age’. Manny is a woolly mammoth, and mammoths are not a product of imagination.

They existed years ago along with dinosaurs and pterodactyls that once roamed the earth. They are the predecessors of our elephants today. There are dozens of remains that prove they exist and I’m sure the recent discovery of these two farmers will surely leave you in awe.





Two farmers, James Bristle and his neighbor Trent Satterthwaite, were both working on the irrigation of their fields when they accidentally hit something hard. At first, they thought it was just a rock, but as they continued digging about 8 feet deep they realized the rock as form seems like a “bent post”.

It was strange, so they continued until they found out that it was actually a remain of a woolly mammoth.

Who would’ve thought that one of history’s biggest discoveries was hiding underneath their fields!

These Michigan farmers not only unveiled one part of the mammoth but 20% of the woolly mammoth’s remains including the head and the tusks, several ribs, a set of vertebrae and more.



Just look at those huge tusks, that woolly mammoth can certainly cut down a tree easily and they must’ve lived 10,000 years ago.

A professor at the University of Michigan named Dan Fisher believes that this giant creature must be in its 40’s or 50’s when it died and the other parts of its skeleton must have been taken by other humans who lived in that area before. He also said that the record of the woolly mammoths uncovered in Michigan was a total of 30! But only five or less have been this massive.

It was not stated whether the farmers received a reward for the skeletons, but I’m sure they were more than happy they can finally fix the irrigation of their fields. There are only theories of what might have happened to the extinction of the woolly mammoths, but we can only be thankful they’re not around to stomp our houses down.







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